X

CARmag.co.za is best viewed in Firefox or Google Chrome web browsers.

Download Firefox here
Download Google Chrome here
Feedback is welcome – good or bad! Contact our webmaster

Corvette at Auto Africa

by CAR magazine on 29/10/2004

Comments: 0

There has been a rush of new GM models recently, with the most notable being the launch of the new Opel Astra. However, at the Auto Africa stand, this stunning Astra is forced to share the limelight with the striking new Corvette C6.

There has been a rush of new GM models recently, with the most notable being the launch of the new Opel Astra. However, at the Auto Africa stand, this stunning Astra is forced to share the limelight with the striking new Corvette C6.

The 2005 Corvette Coupé continues the legendary American sportscar’s progress. It only recently went into production in the US and the six-litre V8 engine produces a thumping 298 kW at 6 000 r/min and torque of 542 N.m at 4 400 r/min. The C6 is mated to a four-speed automatic or six-speed manual transmission that propels the car to 100 km/h in under five seconds.

Features on the C6 include active handling, ABS, traction control and four-wheel independent suspension, but as it is only produced as a left-hand drive model, it will not be available in South Africa.

Also on the GM stand, was Opel’s Eco-Speedster is the result of the brand’s vision of creating a performance diesel offering. Using the 1,3-litre Ecotec CDTI diesel engine, initial testing showed the 82 kW engine was able to take the car to speeds of about 250 km/h.

The 1,3-litre is packed with the latest diesel technology, including a multi-jet common rail with four valves per cylinder and a variable geometry turbocharger.

Compared with diesel engines using older technology, this version uses ten per cent less fuel and reduces exhaust emissions by as much as 40 per cent.

The range of CDTI diesel engines using the latest technology is available in SA and will be added to the existing Corsa diesel range. Opel also plans to introduce a diesel version of its Meriva mini MPV and the new Astra.

Launched in South Africa last month, the Astra is available with four engine derivatives and three trim levels.

Engines included in the line-up range from the 77 kW 1,6-litre Twinport Ecotec to the 92 kW 1,8-litre Ecotec 16-valve engine. The 1,8-litre model is available with four-speed automatic and five-speed manual transmissions.

Suspension is by McPherson struts up front and a patented torsion beam with a double-walled U-shaped profile at the rear.

On display too was the Astra station wagon or Caravan. At 2,7 m, the wheelbase is about nine centimetres longer than that of the five-door version. With its roomy 4,51 m X 2,03 m X 1,5 m dimensions, the wagon has a load limit of up to 500 litres.

Using the optional sliding rear seat, the load space then increases to a cavernous 540 litres. Folding the split rear seats forward increases the load space to about 1 590 litres while, with the optional folding front passenger seat, this area can be extended even further.

The Astra Caravan will be released in South Africa in 2005.

With the most dramatic interpretation of the new Astra face yet, the striking GTC, with its short overhangs and smooth lines, oozes sexiness. The arched roofline and pinched rear window create a sharp profile and add to the car’s powerful stance. Adding to this, the GTC’s roofline is around 32 mm lower than that of the five-door, while the car itself is lower by about 15 mm.

The great feature of the GTC is its panoramic windshield, allowing the driver and front passenger an almost unlimited field of vision. Made from Solar-Protect glass, it extends seamlessly from the bonnet up into the roof as far as the B pillar.

An adjustable shading system protects the passengers from excessive sunlight.

The stunning GTC will be on introduced in Europe early in the second quarter of 2005.