The keenly awaited Audi Le Mans is expected to go on sale in two years’ time and the Ingolstadt-based firm recently tested its supercar’s components in a Lamborghini Gallardo mule, a report claims.

The keenly awaited Audi Le Mans is expected to go on sale in two years’ time and the Ingolstadt-based firm recently tested its supercar’s components in a Lamborghini Gallardo mule, a report claims.
Under the skin, the Le Mans is based heavily on the Gallardo, the V10-powered supercar built in Sant’Agata, Italy. Among the key components shared by both cars are the aluminium spaceframe, high-tensile steel floorpan, lightweight wiring loom, brake system and double wishbone suspension. But Audi sources told that unique powerplants and electromagnetic dampers would provide the Le Mans with a “vastly different character” to that of the Gallardo.
Codenamed AU714, a Le Mans prototype - disguised underneath several Gallardo body panels - was recently spotted during a test session at the Nürburgring circuit in Germany.
Audi is working on two naturally-aspirated powerplants to replace the twin-turbocharged 5,0-litre V10 fitted to the Le Mans concept car, which was unveiled at last year’s Frankfurt Motor Show. Early models are likely to receive a tweaked version of the A8’s 4,2-litre V8, producing a beefy 317 kW.
Also under development is a 40-valve 5,2-litre V10 engine, which uses the same 88 mm cylinder spacing and compact chain-drive system as Audi’s existing 90-degree V8.
The target output for the new engine is 388 kW, sent to all four wheels via a second-generation DSG (dual-clutch) transmission. Audi board members are undecided over whether to go with a six-speed arrangement or an even more complex seven-speed ‘box in a bid to match BMW’s new seven-speed SMG (sequential manual transmission), as fitted to the new M5.
Audi is also preparing a new active-damping system for the Le Mans. Dubbed Magnesport, it uses electromagnetic impulses to continuously alter the viscosity of the oil in the dampers, allowing for both Sporting and Comfort modes, the report noted.