The International Court of Appeal will announce its ruling on the legality of Jenson Button's BAR-Honda today. In the meantime, Renault's Fernando Alonso has accused Ferrari of cheating and the FIA has called for expulsion of the British team if found guilty.

The International Court of Appeal will announce its ruling on the legality of Jenson Button's BAR-Honda today. In the meantime, Renault's Fernando Alonso has accused Ferrari of cheating and the FIA has called for expulsion of the British team if found guilty.

BAR Honda is under scrutiny after it was found that the car in which Jenson Button finished third in the San Marino Grand Prix was five kilograms lighter than the minimum 600 kg weight requirement.

Formula One Management head Bernie Ecclestone has offered little hope of BAR being found innocent and on Wednesday said a fine would not suffice if the team was found guilty of cheating. The FIA has also called on BAR-Honda's dismissal from the championship if it is found guilty.

"If you can do that why doesn't a team at the beginning of the season give over a cheque and say if I'm caught cash the cheque," said Ecclestone.

"I suppose if they are not excluded from the championship you could say the constructor cannot score points in the championship and maybe the driver is excluded from the points he has now and all the other ones count."

"With the information that's available, you have to assume they'll be found guilty," he claimed. "There's always a reason for these things - it's never a mistake. If they said they had a problem and they needed a particular part, they would have gone to the FIA."

Current championship leader Renault's Fernando Alonso offered little sympathy to BAR-Honda, adding that BAR was not the only cheating team on the grid.

"There are two teams that cheat," the Spaniard said. "The first is BAR Honda, that was proved in San Marino, and the second is Ferrari."

Alonso said that all teams tested for six days whereas Ferrari tested for 20 days. However, the Italian team made it clear that it would not join the nine teams in limited testing this season. This is legal according to the FIA, which does not regulate individual team testing.

It has also been suggested that BAR-Honda was not the only team to use a "secret" fuel tank. Aero Tec Technologies, the manufacturer of the fuel cells used in most F1 cars, has reportedly been inundated with orders since the BAR saga came to light . . .