BMW and PSA Peugeot Citroën have unveiled two new petrol engines, which are products of the companies’ two-year-old joint-development venture, and will do duty in the next Mini.

BMW and PSA Peugeot Citroën have unveiled two new petrol engines, which are products of the companies’ two-year-old joint-development venture, and will do duty in the next Mini.
From 2006, the engines will be used in supermini and subcompact cars produced by Peugeot and Citroën, as well as future Mini models (replacing the 1,6-litre Brazilian-made Chrysler units currently used in the BMW Group’s British-made products).
Production is expected to eventually total roughly one million units a year, reported. The first engine is a 1,6-litre engine with a variable geometry turbocharger and a power output of 85 kW and the other a 1,6-litre direct injection, compressed turbo engine with a power output of 105 kW.
Those engines, the companies said, were the first of a family that will eventually comprise powerplants producing outputs from 55 kW to 125 kW. Future units will have systems such as “variable valve timing, fully-controlled oil pump, single belt drive for all ancillary components, cylinder heads produced by lost foam casting, twin-scroll turbochargers and self-disengaging water pumps that are claimed to reduce fuel consumption and emissions”.

“The co-operation between BMW Group and PSA Peugeot Citroën clearly demonstrates that gasoline engines still offer great potential for technological progress, thus contributing to the reduction of consumption and CO2 emissions while enhancing car performance and related driving pleasure,” the two automakers said in a statement.

PSA has a separate diesel engine joint venture with Ford. Engines from that alliance include the acclaimed 2,7-litre V6 turbodiesel used in the Jaguar S-type and Land Rover Discovery 3.