Ferrari’s president Luca di Montezemolo has lashed out at proposed changes to F1 testing, saying it amounted to manipulation, and had his say about the possible rival race series.

Ferrari’s president Luca di Montezemolo has lashed out at proposed changes to F1 testing, saying it amounted to manipulation, and had his say about the possible rival race series.

In an interview with the German newspaper, Welt am Sonntag, di Montezemolo said the proposal to reduce the amount of days allowed for testing by the F1 teams was absurd.

However, the FIA and Ferrari’s rivals would like to see an end to the Italian team’s recent dominance, and the nine remaining teams have agreed to restrict themselves to just 24 days of testing once the season gets underway. Ferrari receives a substantial testing budget and has unlimited access to the Fiorano and Mugello circuits.

“If I want to test five days a week with my team, that is my problem,” di Montezemolo said. “It is my money. Even if I throw it out of the window, I am able to do what I want with it."

Talking about the future of F1 once the Concorde Agreement lapses, he said: "There will be only one F1 World Championship in 2008 and we should take a decision on that in 2005. I know that Bernie Ecclestone owns the rights to the 'Formula One' name but it doesn't really matter to me.

“Whoever rules over the new Formula One must know that there must be big changes to profit sharing and the say the teams and manufacturers. If there's no solution, then, from 2008, there will be a new series organised on our behalf."

Di Montezemolo’s argument hinges on the recent London High Court ruling that allowed Ecclestones’ partners in F1’s holding company SLEC to take up the rights conveyed by their majority shareholding. The court ruled that the two SLEC board members, appointed to their positions by Ecclestone, where not entitled to these positions, casting serious doubt over the F1 kingpin’s future.

The Ferrari boss said he hoped that 80 per cent of all revenue earned from F1 could be distributed among the teams. Currently, teams only receive about 45 per cent of the sport’s earnings.

He maintained, though, that the administration of the championship was “not his business” saying that as long as teams received an appropriate payment “we can leave the management of the championship to an external operation."

However, di Montezemolo did agree to the plan to have F1 cars propelled by 2,4-litre V8s which would need to last for two complete race meetings, which some feel could help address the high costs of running an F1 team.

"It will be a technical challenge for everyone and, simultaneously, will reduce costs because we will need fewer motors at the end of the development," di Montezomolo commented. "I find that good."