The senate of world motorsport's ruling body, the FIA, has recommended that the guilty verdict against the seven teams who refused to race in the US Grand Prix on June 19 be reversed.

The senate of world motorsport's ruling body, the FIA, has recommended that the guilty verdict against the seven teams who refused to race in the US Grand Prix on June 19 be reversed.

Renault, McLaren, Toyota, Williams, Red Bull, Sauber and BAR-Honda were found guilty of bringing the sport into disrepute after refusing to race in the US. The teams declined to race on safety grounds after their tyre supplier, Michelin, had announced it could not guarantee the safety of the teams' tyres. The seven teams withdrew from the race after completing the formation lap.

On Thursday, the senate said the teams could have faced serious legal problems had they chosen to race, despite the tyre manufacturer's warnings.

"Having examined the new evidence and discussed it with Mr (Ron) Dennis and Mr (Christian) Horner, the Senate was satisfied that the teams were contractually bound to follow the instructions of their tyre supplier, and that their tyre supplier had expressly prohibited them from racing at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in its licensed configuration," a statement issued by the FIA stated.

"Both the FIA and the teams could have faced serious legal difficulties in the United States had they not observed their respective rules and contractual obligations (particularly had there been any kind of accident). The Senate was of the view that disciplinary proceedings against the teams had ceased to be appropriate and were not longer in the interest of the sport."

The senate added that it would recommend to the World Motor Sport Council that the teams not be disciplined.

McLaren boss Dennis represented six of the seven teams at the hearing, and said: "Because of the document written by Michelin which said it was dangerous to race, we would have risked being sued, even if we had not had an accident, because of an Indiana State law which allows for court action against those who put other people's lives in danger."

Horner attended on behalf of Red Bull Racing, which had conducted its own defence at the original Paris hearing, before joining the six other teams in issuing a joint appeal against the initial sentence.

On June 29, the teams had been found guilty of failing to ensure that they had suitable tyres for the race and for refusing to race at the Indianapolis circuit. The World Motor Sport Council was to have handed down sentences at another hearing in September.