Following Ferrari's shock deflection to Bernie Ecclestone's camp last week, the remaining teams have grudgingly agreed to take further steps to cut the cost of F1.

Following Ferrari's shock deflection to Bernie Ecclestone's camp last week, the remaining teams have grudgingly agreed to take further steps to cut the cost of F1.

The nine remaining F1 teams have agreed to reduce the number of private testing to 30 days between the first and last races. Ferrari remains the only team that has not agreed to comply with continued efforts to reduce the costs of running F1 by limiting its private test sessions.

Ferrari has continued to oppose this development and is expected to conduct its multiple tests throughout the season at its private circuit. However, the other teams have indicated that they intend to use the team's decision to their advantage. Any Ferrari success would be attributed to the team's operating outside of the restrictions and its gaining of an unfair advantage.

Max Mosley, president of the FIA, wants to impose further short-term changes to the sport, including aerodynamic and tyre change restrictions. The nine teams have said they would prefer the more radical changes to be evaluated once the season has commenced.

"Cost-cutting proposals should be evaluated in the wider context of the sport's appeal to its fans," the teams said in a letter addressed to Mosley. "We anticipate that we will be in a position to bring our collective proposals to the FIA by mid-season, allowing sufficient time to consult all parties and reach an appropriate conclusion by the end of the year."

Thus far, Ferrari is the only team to have agreed to Bernie Ecclestone's new Concorde Agreement after breaking ties with the rival Grand Prix World Championship last week.

Ferrari, along with Renault, Williams and McLaren, was one of the initiators of the rival series after teams expressed unhappiness at the way in which F1 and its resources were being administered.

The remaining nine teams have indicated that they are in no hurry to sign the new agreement, which will commence in 2008 once the current Concorde Agreement expires.