Motorists affected by DaimlerChrysler's global recall of 1,3 million Mercedes-Benzes (to check and/or repair electrical and braking-system defects) will soon be contacted by their dealerships.

Motorists affected by DaimlerChrysler's global recall of 1,3 million Mercedes-Benzes (to check and/or repair electrical and braking-system defects) will soon be contacted by their dealerships.


The voltage regulator in the alternator of six- and eight-cylinder petrol-engined Mercedes Benz built between June 2001 and November 2004 will be checked and, if necessary, replaced.


E-Class models built between January 2002 and January 2005 will have battery-control software replaced to enhance the on-board power supply, and E-Class and SL models built from June 2001 until last month will receive updated braking systems, the company said.


Apparently, some Mercedes owners in Europe (no incidents have been reported in South Africa) experienced partial brake failure where the electro-hydraulic system malfunctioned and reverted to "fail-safe" normal power-assisted hydraulic braking.


The brakes, including ABS, still work normally - but only if the driver applies more foot pressure than normally required.


The Stuttgart-based manufacturer says the recalls are part of a new campaign by Mercedes-Benz division boss Eckhard Cordes to boost quality and fix customers' complaints.


"We are now producing the best product quality ever," Cordes said, "and our aim is to ensure that vehicles already in the hands of customers which are the cause of complaints achieve a standard of quality that reflects our highest expectations."


Mercedes-Benz has set up a hotline to answer South African customers' questions: 0800 213 141. The hotline will operate from 8.30am to 5pm on weekdays.