Two years after the spunky Honda Jazz was introduced, it has been tweaked and has some added conveniences - including satellite steering controls - for greater appeal.Two years after the spunky Honda Jazz was introduced, it has been tweaked and has some added conveniences - including satellite steering controls - for greater appeal.

The cosmetic changes to the Jazz include reshaped bumpers while both the front and rear light clusters have been revisited. New as well are the indicator lights fitted inside the exterior mirror housings for greater all-round visibility.

On the inside, the updated Jazz now sports a redesigned instrument cluster with an improved radio/CD player. It now also has a leather-trimmed steering wheel with satellite controls while the seats have received new coverings. Again, the CVT version is fitted with gearshift paddles on the steering wheel for easier shifting in the seven-speed manual mode.

The compact Jazz makes optimal use of its limited space; by placing the fuel tank beneath the front seats, cinema-style rear seats are able to fold up or completely flat for greater load space. The boot space measures a roomy 353 litres, but with the seats down there is a cavernous 1 323 litres of space.

The car remains generously equipped, with air conditioning, remote central locking, and electrically retractable and adjustable mirrors as standard. Electric windows all round, front and rear cupholders, and four head restraints are listed among the added conveniences.

Safety features include dual airbags, three-point seatbelts for all five occupants, and ABS with EBD and EBA for maximum stopping power. It now rides on standard 15-inch alloy wheels, as opposed to the previous 14-inch steel wheels, which also signal better handling and aesthetics.

Mechanically both models remain unchanged with figures of 61 kW and 119 N.m. The four-cylinder unit uses Dual Spark Plug Sequential Ignition (i-DSi) technology for increased fuel economy, which is noted at about six litres per 100 kilometres.