Peugeot once did it to Porsche in the sixties, and has now been denied access to use the name 1007 itself since it too closely resembles a famous secret agent's code name.

Peugeot once did it to Porsche in the sixties, and has now been denied access to use the name 1007 itself since it too closely resembles a famous secret agent's code name.

The French manufacturer has been using the double zero since 1929, and this year announced a break in tradition with the "double central zero" designations.

Peugeot has always jealously guarded its middle zero and when Porsche introduced the 901 in 1963, Peugeot insisted it be renamed, thus the legendary 911 was born.

Now the owners of the James Bond trademark have disputed Peugeot's "one-double-oh-seven" pronunciation, saying it’s too close to James Bond's code name. After Peugeot went to great lengths to ensure people got the city car's pronunciation right, it will now be called "one-thousand-and-seven".

The French manufacturer has been using a three digit numbering system continuously since the 201 model was launched. Up to now, the second digit - always 0 - has been the link between the number denoting the size of the car and the third digit denoting the generation.

Until now, special symbols were added to model designations as required. Such is the case for example of the Coupé Cabriolet, designated by the letters CC, and the family/leisure, identified by SW.