There were two more horror crashes during peak-hour traffic on Tuesday… On the N12 in the Northern Cape, the driver of an ambulance and five patients burned to death after the vehicle they were travelling in collided with a car.

There were two more horror crashes during peak-hour traffic on Tuesday… On the N12 in the Northern Cape, the driver of an ambulance and five patients burned to death after the vehicle they were travelling in collided with a car.

A total of seven people were killed in the accident – Northern Cape police said the driver of the car also died on the scene.

The accident occurred at about 7:30 am while the ambulance was transporting patients from Kimberly to Victoria West. The ambulance caught fire after the crash, while the “jaws of life” had to be used to free the crushed driver’s body from the car.

Inspector Tony Modise said five men and a woman died at the crash and a young girl died on the way to hospital.

In a second major accident on Tuesday morning, 19 people were injured, six critically, when two minibus taxis, a bus and a car were in a collision on Grayston Drive in Sandton, Johannesburg.

Johannesburg metro police spokesman, Chief Superintendent Wayne Minnaar, said: "There is a sharp increase in traffic volumes because individuals and businesses are all meeting deadlines before the December shut-down.

"Added to this, the rain put the robots out of action and that causes back-ups which make people impatient."

The latest incidents highlight the issue of road safety, following last week’s fatal crashes. On Sunday night, 12 minibus-taxi passengers died in a collision between their vehicle and a truck on the N2 near Piet Retief in Mpumalanga.

Earlier 15 people, mainly pensioners and vendors, were killed when a truck ploughed into them as they were collecting their grants and conducting businesses along the road.

At the Annual Road Congress concluded in Durban last week, Transport Minister Dullah Omar, held bi-lateral meetings with his counterparts in other countries to find ways to reduce the high level of carnage on South African roads.