Despite finishing second and third in the Canadian Grand Prix, Ferrari should not have unrealistic expectations ahead of this weekend's race, says Michael Schumacher... The team's focus may already be shifting towards the 2006 season.

Despite finishing second and third in the Canadian Grand Prix, Ferrari should not have unrealistic expectations ahead of this weekend's race, says Michael Schumacher... The team's focus may already be shifting towards the 2006 season.


On Tuesday, Schumacher was quoted as saying that victory would, in all likelihood, still elude Ferrari at Indianapolis. The seven-time world champion said the team's performance expectations for Indianapolis would not be any higher than they were for Canada.


Due to the retirement of both Renaults and the disqualification of Juan-Pablo Montoya's McLaren-Mercedes from the Canadian Grand Prix, Schumacher and team-mate Rubens Barrichello completed the podium.


"Our performance has improved a little," the German said, "but, honestly, the result was also down to luck."


Schumacher added: "As long as we're not competitive in every stage of the race - and we're not - we're not a top team. But I am sure that our time will come."


With South African Rory Byrne taking a more behind-the-scenes role in the development of the F2005, the car's chief designer, Aldo Costa, has been the target of much criticism.


However, Ferrari team boss Jean Todt squashed speculation that Byrne had been requested to personally fine tune the F2005's tyre dynamics: "I don't want to be cynical, but it's what he does every day. He's head of the project to analyse the whole situation."


Todt also brushed aside concerns about the reliability of the F2005's gearbox, and asked: "If our gearbox was 100 per cent reliable, will our car be quicker?"


However, with the 2005 title steadily slipping away, Ferrari Technical director Ross Brawn admitted that team resources would shortly be diverted from the current "F2005" development project to the scarlet team's successor.


"Clearly, we're not competitive enough," the Briton was quoted as saying. "If we pour our efforts into this year and sacrifice next, I'm not sure that's the right choice."


An element that may require more time to develop will be the role of a 2,4-litre V8 engine in the "F2006" project.


Brawn said a "hybrid" car was already being built for development of the 2006 engine. "Then, we're intending to have the race car ready earlier than this one," he added.