There are still many automotive snobs who think that a modern-day car cannot be regarded as stylish unless it hails from Italy, France or, in some cases, Germany. Here are two reasons why the Toyota and Lexus stands at Auto Africa suggest otherwise…

There are still many automotive snobs who think that a modern-day car cannot be regarded as stylish unless it hails from Italy, France or, in some cases, Germany. Here are two reasons why the Toyota and Lexus stands at Auto Africa suggest otherwise…


CARtoday.com reported recently that Lexus had been setting up new design studios around the globe, but particularly in the US, to spark a design revolution at the elegant, yet predictable, Japanese luxury brand. The initiative appeared to be paying dividends earlier this year when Lexus unveiled the dashing LF-C concept - a coupe/roadster equipped with a metal folding-roof and believed to form the platform for the successor to the current IS series.


Two of the biggest showstoppers at this year’s Auto Africa Expo pre-date the LF-C, but nevertheless offer evidence that the Toyota Motor Corporation is gradually shedding its conservative image and adopting a sporty flavour in its bid to become the world’s biggest automotive manufacturer.


First shown at the Tokyo Motor Show almost exactly a year ago, the Toyota CS&S has classic sports car design cues, 2+2 seating configuration, mid-mounted petrol electric engine, short chassis and an E-Four (electric four-wheel drive) transmission.


The geometric form of the CS&S organically melds wheel arches with 2-seater canopy lines. The contrast of curves and sharp angles on the CS&S body complements its short, wide and low-slung unique proportions.


The interior is uncomplicated in its layout and a horseshoe motif defines individual spaces for driver and passenger. A rear seat can be made available by sliding open the rear canopy. When both front seats are folded down, the CS&S’ extendable cover provides added security.


But the CS&S is only retro from an exterior design point of view. At the wheel, the Space Touch driving interface projects a magnified image of the driving interface (vehicle controls) on a screen so that controls appear to float in mid-air. By "touching" these virtual controls, a video camera captures the driver’s hand position to operate the car navigation system, air conditioner, and other functions.


Article written by

CAR magazine


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