It seems some traffic officials are desperate to catch motorists, with policemen in Florida going undercover as beggars. Read more in our collection of motoring tales.

‘Beggars’ trap motorists

It seems some traffic officials are desperate to catch motorists, with policemen in Florida going undercover as beggars.

reported that policemen in Kissimmee in Florida launched “Operation Vagrant” sporting fake teeth, tattered clothing and pushing shopping trolleys. They then radioed officers ahead to warn them of speeding cars.

Homeless centre groups are protesting this action. "It's ironic that they use a disguise of someone who people think of as visually offensive. I just think it shows that the community's aware of the homeless problem.

“I wish they would solve the speeding problem, rather than masquerading," said Robert Brown, president and chief executive officer of the Coalition for the Homeless of Central Florida.

No speeding – under any circumstances

An ambulance driver in England has been fined for speeding after being clocked doing 167 km/h while delivering a liver for a transplant operation.

reported that Mike Ferguson was racing along with blue lights on when he was caught.

The man whose life was saved by the organ transplant and hospital staffers have slammed the police.

But the chief constable of Lincolnshire Police, Richard Childs, defended the decision. He said the case could clarify traffic law relating to vehicles carrying organs for transplant.

Cameras make motorists MAD

A motorists’ group in Britain has said it is responsible for hundreds of vandalised speed cameras across the country.

The group, called Motorists Against Detection (MAD), has vandalised cameras by setting fire to them, cutting them with angle grinders or spraying them. MAD said it had 200 members and its nickname refers to a type of speed camera

"In the whole of the UK there's a couple of hundred active members carrying out attacks of this nature.

"About 600 cameras have been attacked in the last couple of years by members of the group," said MAD spokesman Captain Gatso.

Gatso said MAD supported cameras in built-up areas, but was against putting them on highways or places where there were no pedestrians.

"This criminal activity is the work of a tiny minority of irresponsible people who are endangering the lives of the public and it is only a matter of time before they are caught," said a spokesman for the Norfolk police.