Despite the decline in sales of light commercial vehicles as reported by Naamsa at the end of September, Burchmore’s has noted a marked increase in the sale of used bakkies.

Despite the decline in sales of light commercial vehicles as reported by Naamsa at the end of September, Burchmore’s has noted a marked increase in the sale of used bakkies.

According to autocluster.com, September's light commercial market dropped back from August by 6,3 per cent and is only up by 1,4 per cent year-on-year. Some analysts say that this reflects significant numbers of businesses holding back in a time of uncertainty about exports as the rand strengthens. It is difficult to understand why even taking the agricultural sector's particular circumstances into account the sales growth in medium and heavy commercials can be said to reflect rising business confidence, while in the weak bakkie market the reverse interpretation is drawn.

Darryl Jacobson, managing director of Burchmore's, revealed that there is an "exceptionally high demand" for used bakkies, mainly from independent construction contractors and owners of small to medium businesses.

However Jacobson comments that the same trend certainly doesn't apply to leisure vehicles. "The demand is for workhorse bakkies - not recreational, fun vehicles," he noted. "This is indicative of the fact that business confidence has improved."